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nVeil Math

nVeil's algorithms generate complex hidden images to get to the veil which transforms an image. This is working behind the scenes, showing the geometry needed to calculate the cells that make the nVeiled image. Here are a few:

And a few more:




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The Windshield Wiper Effect

nVeil Art 600x600 type-on-white.png

While we were developing nVeil, Stanford's Psychology Department head saw it in action and asked if we would come down to demonstrate it to a graduate seminar she taught, as an example of "proximal incidence" (things occurring close enough to appear to be in sync). We had noticed the phenomenon too, when watching nVeiled video and listening to music. Almost any video, and almost any music. It turns out the the timing of changes of most music, the tempo, the events, the emphases, and the motion and color changes in video source fed through nVeil, whether a Toyoto commercial or a feature movie, is so similar that, watching and listening, the viewer often assumes they were created in sync. The graduate students assumed so.  It is the same thing that you might have noticed when listening to music while driving in rain, windshield wiper rhythm, or the turn blinker of the car ahead coming close enough to the music beat. That most incredible construction in the known universe, the human brain, is built to seek and find pattern. And it will make allowance for discrepancy, sure there is something going on. When the two get out of phase we look forward to them getting back together. So we think.


 

 

windshield-wiper-streaks.jpg

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Veil Made from an Historical Source Image

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Veil Made from an Historical Source Image

 

Influenced by the ideas of Cubism in painting, Team nVeil warmly acknowledges the artists of the era and the movement, especially its pioneers. The French artist, Jean Metzinger (June 24, 1883 – November 3, 1956), a painter, theorist, writer, critic and poet is considered a protoCubist, along with Picasso and Braque. Those three visionaries sowed the seeds of one of the most important periods in art history.

From 1908 Metzinger experimented with the faceting of form, a style that would soon become known as Cubism. His involvement in Cubism saw him both as an influential artist and principal theorist of the movement.

In 1911-12 he painted La Femme au Cheval from which we created a new veil.

Try and find that horse

Try and find that horse

237 - Metzinger-4-elim-09-08-14.32.18.png
237 - Metzinger-4-elim-Vashon-09-08-12.59.27.png

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Picasso's Master: Paul Cezanne

Cubism, 100 years ago, the defining art movement of the century, began with Paul Cezanne's influence on Picasso and Braque. Picasso regarded Cézanne as a "mother hovering over," Henri Matisse as "father to us all." Cezanne's reduction of the visible world into basic shapes, faceted brushstrokes that reconstruct nature through painterly forms, the fracture and flattening of space...the beginnings of modern art, is an inspiration for what nVeil Art can help create.

Cezanne - bibemus quarry

Paul Cezanne, Bibemus Quarry, 1900

From the 2013 100th Anniversary of the Art Institute of Chicago's famous Armory Show

In 1943, Pablo Picasso declared to photographer George Brassaï that artist Paul Cézanne was “my one and only master.”

The seminal moment for Picasso was the Cézanne retrospective held at the Salon d’Automne one year after the artist’s death in 1906. Though he previously had been familiar with Cézanne, it was not until the retrospective that Picasso experienced the full impact of his artistic achievement. As he later put it: “Cézanne’s influence gradually flooded everything.”

Cézanne’s insistence on redoing nature according to a system of basic forms was important to Picasso’s own interest at that time. In Cézanne’s work Picasso found a model of how to distill the essential from nature in order to achieve a cohesive surface that expressed the artist’s singular vision. Beginning in 1907, Picasso began to experiment with Cézanne’s techniques alongside fellow artist Georges Braque. Cézanne was a constant touchstone for the two artists during this period of collaboration, which eventually resulted in the invention of Cubism by 1909. Throughout Picasso’s stylistic evolution over the next seven decades, he continued to borrow from and reinterpret Cézanne’s art.


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Klee Village

Tunisian Village, Castle and Sun, by Paul Klee, 1928, interpreted as a vector template (the veil) in a few minutes, then a few nVeiled images and their color source images, each created in a few seconds.

nVeiled from the image above, the Klee original

nVeiled from the image above, the Klee original

nVeiled from the image above

nVeiled from the image above

Original Homage to Bleriot by Delaunay as source image

Original Homage to Bleriot by Delaunay as source image

nVeiled from the image above

nVeiled from the image above

Source image

Source image

nVeiled from the image above

nVeiled from the image above

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Art for the Dead

Commemorating 50 years of musical history, the last 20 in hibernation, the iconic resurrected Dead bid the world Fare Thee Well last weekend. These images are a quick tribute. An SVG image was created, and a new veil made from it, within a few minutes, then feeding it with a series of random source images, each exported in a second or two. Make your own!

139 - Dead-Head-bolts-simple-07-09-14.31.23.png



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Early Cubism

An early Cubist painter, Robert Delauney painted Homage a Bleriot in 1914, (partial above) celebrating the first flight across the English Channel in a heavier-than-air craft, in 1909.

 

As nVeil was developed and experimented with it became clear that in appearance it was generating artwork in the family line of Cubism, the most prevalent art school of the past 100 years. Breaking an image into zones, partitioning an otherwise unbroken image, is at the heart of Cubism, and here we were, having learned from the masters. A 20th Century movement, Cubism is to be seen in the works of many current painters. It endures. nVeil, though, was doing a few other things the pioneers hadn't.

 

From Wikipedia:

Cubism is an early-20th-century avant-garde art movement that revolutionized European painting and sculpture, and inspired related movements in musicliterature and architecture. Cubism has been considered the most influential art movement of the 20th century.[1][2] The term is broadly used in association with a wide variety of art produced in Paris (MontmartreMontparnasse and Puteaux) during the 1910s and extending through the 1920s.

The movement was pioneered by Georges Braque and Pablo Picasso, joined by Jean MetzingerAlbert GleizesRobert DelaunayHenri Le FauconnierFernand Léger and Juan Gris.[3] A primary influence that led to Cubism was the representation of three-dimensional form in the late works of Paul Cézanne.[4] A retrospective of Cézanne's paintings had been held at the Salon d'Automne of 1904, current works were displayed at the 1905 and 1906 Salon d'Automne, followed by two commemorative retrospectives after his death in 1907.[5]

In Cubist artwork, objects are analyzed, broken up and reassembled in an abstracted form—instead of depicting objects from one viewpoint, the artist depicts the subject from a multitude of viewpoints to represent the subject in a greater context.[6]

The impact of Cubism was far-reaching and wide-ranging. Cubism spread rapidly across the globe and in doing so evolved to greater or lesser extent. In essence, Cubism was the starting point of an evolutionary processes that produced diversity; it was the antecedent of diverse art movements.[7]

In France, offshoots of Cubism developed, including OrphismAbstract art and later Purism.[8][9] In other countries FuturismSuprematismDadaConstructivism and De Stijl developed in response to Cubism. Early Futurist paintings hold in common with Cubism the fusing of the past and the present, the representation of different views of the subject pictured at the same time, also called multiple perspective, simultaneity or multiplicity,[10] while Constructivism was influenced by Picasso's technique of constructing sculpture from separate elements.[11] Other common threads between these disparate movements include the faceting or simplification of geometric forms, and the association of mechanization and modern life.

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The 4th

The source image

The source image

Image above nVeiled with the Glory veil, shaded settings, #007 in the Library of 100, one of the earliest

Image above nVeiled with the Glory veil, shaded settings, #007 in the Library of 100, one of the earliest

nVeiled with the Glory veil, flat settings

nVeiled with the Glory veil, flat settings

nVeiled with the Glory veil, satin blur settings

nVeiled with the Glory veil, satin blur settings

Happy Independence Day!

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